Rep. Sid Michaels Kavulich Passes Away at 62

A lawmaker from Lackawanna County has died.

Sid Michaels Kavulich represented the 114th District of the state House of Representatives since he was elected in 2010.

Kavulich was admitted to the hospital earlier this month to undergo heart valve replacement surgery.

Family members say he died after suffering complications from that surgery.

Kavulich represented the 114th Legislative District for the past eight years. The district includes parts of Lackawanna and Luzerne Counties.

Before he became a lawmaker, Kavulich worked for former state Senator Bob Mellow.

Many may remember Kavulich best as Sid Michaels, a news and sports reporter who worked for radio and television stations in Lackawanna and Luzerne Counties for decades.

He worked mainly as a sports anchor at WBRE and WYOU-TV for more than 25 years.

Sid Michaels Kavulich was 62 years old. He is survived by his wife Linda, and their three children.

Governor Wolf has ordered state flags across the commonwealth be lowered to half-staff until the day of the Kavulich’s burial. Funeral arrangments have not yet been announced.

From his biography on the State House website:

Born and raised in Taylor, Rep. Kavulich is a 1974 graduate of Riverside High School, and furthered his education at Williamsport Area Community College, where he earned an associate's degree in broadcasting.

Upon graduation, he worked for several Northeastern Pennsylvania radio stations, including WCDL in Carbondale, WICK, and WEJL/ROCK 107 in Scranton. In 1981, he began a television career that would bring him into the homes of Northeastern and Central Pennsylvania for more than 25 years, working with WBRE-TV and WYOU-TV.

He has written, edited and produced broadcast presentations which featured such honored sports figures as Penn State football coach Joe Paterno and former heavyweight boxing champions Muhammad Ali, Larry Holmes, Joe Frazier, and Mike Tyson. He has been widely recognized for his coverage of nearly every major sporting event in the world, including baseball's World Series, Major League Baseball's All-Star Game, the Super Bowl, NASCAR's Daytona 500 and Brickyard 400, PGA Championship and several world boxing championship fights.

Rep. Kavulich has also served as general manager of St. Ann's Media at St. Ann's Basilica in Scranton, helping to bring the broadcast of the Roman Catholic Mass to national television audience via the Charlotte, N.C.-based Inspiration Network, the only Catholic Mass broadcast on that particular network. He also helped to trace the historic journey of the late Pope John Paul II in the Middle East Holy Land region, broadcasting from the sites visited by the pope.

He is involved with several civic organizations, including Catholic Social Services of the Diocese of Scranton, where he served as president. He is also a member of Broadway Theatre League of Northeastern Pennsylvania, the Abington Rotary, and the Stephanie Jallen Group.

6 comments

  • Colleen Barham

    This man was also President of the Scranton Diocese and no pension accountability to the IRS for priests and charter/private schools convicted of pedophilia. I am not “sure” why WNEP is moderating my posts but I guess it’s because he worked in the “news” room Bob Mellow first allowed the press into Pennsylvania congressional meetings (who is “moderating” my posts to suppress the actual story, in my opinion).. What’s more than this it all goes back to Kids for Cash days. This nan FBI investigation involving 15 democrats and IRS fraud? Pennsylvania laundered 6 billion in Pension funds. Robert Mellow was convicted but his pension was restored in December by “overhaul” of pensions Tom Wolf in June 2017, of course this does not surprise me considering Jerry Sandusky gets to keep his pension too. Pennsylvania’s two largest taxpayer-funded pension systems turned over an estimated $6 billion in fees and other payouts to private money managers in the last decade. Why Pa. public employees can commit crimes and still collect pensions.ARRISBURG — Kevin J. Foley, a Pennsylvania State Police criminal investigator, stabbed a dentist to death.
    Gregory L. Eldred, who taught music at a public school, shot his ex-wife in a Coudersport church while she played the organ during services.Douglas N. Sversko, a state police trooper, danced naked in front of a webcam and transmitted the images to an agent of the attorney general’s child-predator unit posing as a 13-year-old girl.
    Foley, Eldred and Sversko each were convicted and sentenced for their crimes.But that’s not the only thing they have in common.The former state troopers and ex-teacher are still collecting tens of thousands of dollars every year from the state’s troubled pension plans.An analysis of court records and data obtained from the pension systems found numerous instances of state employees collecting pensions after being convicted of violent crimes and certain sex crimes not enumerated under the law.The findings reveal weaknesses in the Pension Forfeiture Act of 1978 — which requires state employees to give up their retirement benefits upon conviction of certain crimes — at a time when the state’s two largest pension plans face $60 billion in unfunded liability.

    • holdencaulfieldisme

      “I’m not sure why my posts are being moderated.”

      Probably because you spam the comments with entire dissertations that go so far into digressions nobody can tell what the hell you were talking about in the first place?

  • Colleen Barham

    Yeah wasn’t he part of the FBI investigation involving 15 democrats and IRS fraud? Pennsylvania laundered 6 billion in Pension funds. Robert Mellow was convicted but his pension was restored in December by “overhaul” of pensions Tom Wolf in June 2017, of course this does not surprise me considering Jerry Sandusky gets to keep his pension too. Pennsylvania’s two largest taxpayer-funded pension systems turned over an estimated $6 billion in fees and other payouts to private money managers in the last decade. Why Pa. public employees can commit crimes and still collect pensions.ARRISBURG — Kevin J. Foley, a Pennsylvania State Police criminal investigator, stabbed a dentist to death.
    Gregory L. Eldred, who taught music at a public school, shot his ex-wife in a Coudersport church while she played the organ during services.Douglas N. Sversko, a state police trooper, danced naked in front of a webcam and transmitted the images to an agent of the attorney general’s child-predator unit posing as a 13-year-old girl.
    Foley, Eldred and Sversko each were convicted and sentenced for their crimes.But that’s not the only thing they have in common.The former state troopers and ex-teacher are still collecting tens of thousands of dollars every year from the state’s troubled pension plans.An analysis of court records and data obtained from the pension systems found numerous instances of state employees collecting pensions after being convicted of violent crimes and certain sex crimes not enumerated under the law.The findings reveal weaknesses in the Pension Forfeiture Act of 1978 — which requires state employees to give up their retirement benefits upon conviction of certain crimes — at a time when the state’s two largest pension plans face $60 billion in unfunded liability.

  • donny hud43987

    So sad, he was indeed a brilliant man! Prayers for the family! And thank you for all you’ve done sid

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