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Fire at Tire Warehouse in Scranton

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SCRANTON -- Fire crews battled a stubborn, smoky fire for hours at a tire warehouse before flames finally broke through the roof, leading to the collapse of two of the building's walls.

The fire started around 5 p.m. Wednesday at a warehouse on Wyoming Avenue owned by Sandone Tire. The building is filled with thousands of tires.

Officials said the reason it's so difficult to put out the flames is because the building is so old and insulated mostly with cork and sawdust, keeping the heat in.

According to the fire chief, the fire was called in as smoke coming from the elevator shaft, but after hours of putting water through the windows and searching, firefighters could not locate the fire itself.

Crews said all but two of the upper floors of the building are used for tire storage.

Black smoke poured from the building Wednesday evening.

After power to the elevator was shut off, there was no way for firefighters to get to the upper floors in the building, so they could only fight it from the outside, chipping away at the bricks to get access.

Firefighters tried to get inside the building from the back. Two firefighters were missing for a short time when they lost their hose in the heavy smoke. One was checked out for smoke inhalation and was given oxygen. They were not seriously hurt.

"I looked out the window, and I saw this tremendous fire- from six blocks away, and the flames were shooting four stories into the air, there were explosions. Sounds like the roof collapsed," said a man from Scranton.

The roof of the building did collapse after emergency crews were pulled out from being inside of the building,

The fire chief said this fire could be burning for days.

Due to road closures in Scranton,  there will be no COLTS bus service on Washington or Wyoming Avenue from Mulberry to Ash Street.  Routes 12, 14, 15, 53 will use their regular route to Vine Street to Jefferson Ave to regular route. Routes 41 and 52 will use Mulberry Street to Capouse Avenue to Ash Street for their regular route.

Below are some WNEP Insider photos and videos from the scene


20 comments

  • Alek

    so my water is black and smells like burnt rubber, i live like 5 blocks away. is anyone else having this problem

    • AFailedjusticesystem.

      yeah…….its not good. how does back flow like that happen….probably cancer causing to. makes the coffee strong though

  • DIMEBAG KNOW IT ALL DUNCE

    how many bricks does it even take to make a building? who let all those bricks on that building?

    • Yep

      People with money and have a foot in with the cities don’t have to because they pay people off to shhhhh them.. Just like the Dunmore old high school building. No fire system in it at all…

  • Gretchen Kennedy

    If the fire Depts in Scranton will remember the big National Item back in the 1980’s was the tire fire outside Milville at Starr’s Tire Pile, it took weeks to get it under control. I lived in W.Va. at the time and we got the smoke clear down there. WhenI called my parents in Danville, they said they couldn’t even go outside for all of te smoke. What they need to do in this case is to somehow get those tires out of tha building & away from town.

  • ReallY?

    After investigating this one as negligence on Scranton city part, reopen the investigation into the old dunmore highschool fire. He had the basement and 2nd floor filled with flammable items…tires, old furniture, polyurethane barrels of it, old wooden lamp posts, the old desks , lockers, and items from his other business there. and funny now the cleaning has been stopped in Dunmore the remains of the building still are there but its OK he opened a restaurant with the millions he got from his tenants insurance… I smell this one will be the same scenario

  • MARY ANN

    I WONDER IF HE BUILDING INSPECTORS KNEW ABOUT TIRES BEING STORED IN THAT BUILDING, AND IF SO WHY DIDN’T THEY CITE THE COMPANY. THAT SHOULD HAVE NEVER BEEN ALLOWED AND I CAN’T HELP BUT WONDER IF SOMEONE WAS GIVEN A PAYOFF TO KEEP QUIET.

    • jenniferlynn329

      Of course they knew. It’s a main building down where the tractor trailers unload the items. Right on Wyoming Ave. That’s a commercial district. I’d bet more than half the buildings are active storage facilities.

    • Gretchen Kennedy

      I agree with you about what you say Regarding City Codes. I should put that comment in my comment. Shame on the Scranton City Council for allowing these people(or others) to even allow companies to use buildings in town to keep tires, flamible stuff, or anything that can make a huge fire.

  • Nelson

    I’m probably 1.5 miles away and th smoke is simply unbearable. I feel sorry for the animals outside.
    Filling a large building with combustible material i.e., fuel, is a foreseeable hazard. Especially in the middle of a city. It’s risking a catastrophe. Someone should go to jail for this.

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