Women Climbing the Ranks in Professional Sports

MOOSIC, Pa. -- Men have traditionally occupied high-ranking posts within professional sports organizations, but over the last few years, more and more women are starting to climb the ranks in sports.

Minor League Baseball just announced a new mentorship program to help continue that trend.

At PNC Field in Moosic, Katie Beekman's work ethic is on full display. As vice president and assistant general manager of the Scranton Wilkes-Barre RailRiders, her workdays can sometimes last 14 hours

"You have to do the grunt work and you have to put the hours in. It's a whole different lifestyle change. I spend more time at work than I do with my family during the summer and it's a sacrifice I make and that they make, honestly," Beekman said.

As recently as just a few years ago, it was almost unprecedented for a female to hold a high ranking position within a professional sports organization.

"Am I surprised I'm where I'm at? No," Beekman said. "I'm very dedicated to what I do, and I am passionate about helping cultivate younger female professionals to become an executive within their own industry or within their own team."

That mindset figures to bode well for Beekman because Minor League Baseball just announced a new mentorship program called "LIFT" -- Leaders Inspiring Future Talent.

The mission of the program is to develop the next generation of women executives in the baseball industry.

Beekman will be mentoring Ayla Acosta of the Winston Salem Dash, the Class A affiliate of the Chicago White Sox.

"I'm not going to lie. I went to meetings for a national championship game a couple months ago and I walked into a boardroom of about 40 men and I was the only female sitting in that room, so you have to be comfortable in your own skin and be confident in what you do and hold your own and prove yourself. "

As a mentor in the program, Beekman hopes to influence and inspire other females to get involved in professional sports.