On Suicide, Scranton Counseling Center Offers Help

SCRANTON, Pa. -- This week's suicide related deaths of Kate Spade and Anthony Bourdain have put prevention in the forefront.

We sat down with mental health experts at the Scranton Counseling Center in downtown Scranton.

"It's hard to think about someone's death in a positive way, but in the very least, there will be more attention to this terrible subject," said Judy Nauroth.

In a study released this week, the Centers for Disease Control says the number of suicides has been on the rise, upwards of 33 percent since 1999.

According to the Lackawanna County coroner, there have been 245 suicide-related deaths over the past five years.

"Ordinarily, that strong impulse doesn't last longer than 72 hours so if the person having thoughts can be supported or even distracted," Nauroth said.

She says a person having those suicidal thoughts needs to be helped.

"If someone you love admits to having suicidal thoughts, if you could try to reassure them that this is temporary and this will pass or it will go away in 72 hours," Nauroth advised.

"98 percent of people who have had a suicide attempt don't go on to make another attempt and they go on to have a fulfilling life," said Kathy Wallace.

Wallace is the president of the Northeast Suicide Prevention Initiative, a volunteer group that raises money for training across northeastern Pennsylvania and helps counsel families who have lost someone to suicide.

"If you reach out and you talk to someone, it may be prevented," said Wallace.

If you know someone struggling with depression or suicidal thoughts, free help is available.

SCRANTON COUNSELING CENTER – 570-348-6100
NORTHEAST SUICIDE PREVENTION INITIATIVE – 570-575-2343
PROJECT TREVOR HOTLINE -- 866-488-7386

You can contact the National Suicide Prevention Hotline:

PHONE: 1-800-273-8255
TEXT:  “HOME” to 741741

Click here to learn the risk factors for suicide.