Some Voters Puzzled by New Congressional Districts in Primary

DALLAS, Pa. -- Tuesday's primary election marks the first time that Pennsylvania's newly redrawn congressional map comes into play for voters.

In Luzerne County, the new congressional map splits up the Dallas area, making the lead-up to the primary a little confusing for some voters we spoke with. Others are ready to cast their votes to help promote change.

Many of us have seen the advertisements on TV and signs along roadways. Primary election season is here. One Luzerne County man says he's happy it's finally here.

"I'm looking forward to getting rid of some of them politicians that bad-mouth each other," said Glenn Hoit of Evans Falls.

Tuesday's primary will debut the new congressional map after it was redesigned by the Pennsylvania Supreme Court over concerns about gerrymandering.

One voter was happy to see the court-ordered change.

"I'm glad gerrymandering came to an end. It was getting really ridiculous and corrupt and dishonest and I'm glad it was put to an end," said Sharon Hinkelman.

For the past several years, the borough of Dallas and Dallas Township were in the 11th Congressional District. The new congressional map splits the Dallas area into the 8th and 9th Districts. This has some voters confused leading up to Tuesday's primary election.

"Who do you vote for? What district are you in? Who's running in that district? I had to read the whole newspaper this morning to figure out what's going on," said Martin Bisher of Dallas.

Sometimes the younger generation isn't well represented when it comes to voting. One Dallas High School student wants to put that stigma to rest.

"Now that I turned 18, I can vote. I used to think that your vote doesn't really matter, but thinking about it, if everyone says that and nobody votes, nobody changes anything, but if everyone comes together and it's what they believe in, you can make a difference," said senior Bryce Vandeutsch.

Polls will open Tuesday at 7 a.m. and close at 8 p.m.