Pottsville Firefighters Now Using App to Help Fight Fires

POTTSVILLE -- The Pottsville Fire Department is now using an app to help them fight fires.

The app is called "IamResponding." Pottsville Fire started using it on a trial basis about two months ago. Now, they're subscribing to it full-time. The app allows firefighters to alert one another about who will be responding to a scene. Pottsville Fire Chief Todd March said this app is a big deal because all of his firefighters are volunteers.

Pottsville Fire started using it on a trial basis about two months ago. Now, they're subscribing to it full-time. The app allows firefighters to alert one another about who will be responding to a scene. Pottsville Fire Chief Todd March said this app is a big deal because all of his firefighters are volunteers.

Pottsville Fire Chief Todd March said this app is a big deal because all of his firefighters are volunteers.

"It is going to help save time because (firefighters) don't have to wait for people that might not be coming," Chief March said.

Nearby Schuylkill Haven Fire Department started using the app at the beginning of the year. They, too, are all volunteer firefighters.

"Back when I started in the early 80s, there were more people that could leave work to come to calls," Schuylkill Haven Fire Department Assistant Chief Jim Reed said. "That's not so anymore. A lot of people have to travel out of the area to work and a lot of employers just won't let them go."

The app has a number of other features useful to firefighters. It uses Google Maps to show them other information such as where fire hydrants are or how to get to a scene using GPS.

"Any kind of hazards that we might encounter on any buildings, they're all on this map, so when they're going in they can see on the map what's where," March said.

The app costs about $800 a year for the fire departments to use. Firefighters said that with how much has changed in their profession over the years, having an app like this one helps out a lot.

"We struggle for manpower," Reed said. "That is not just here. That is around the country, I should think. Having this and knowing what you have allows if I'm in charge of a scene, I'll know whether I need to call for more help sooner."

 

10 comments

  • in the know

    I don’t know of a Fire Department in the Area that hasn’t been using one of these apps for years. There are several out there and even the 911 centers can access them to se who is responding. So they finally caught up with everyone else…..

  • Hallo

    I used to go toPootsville for work. People are really off there. It was like trailer trash pretending they were living in nyc. They make those frackville street roamers look alright.

  • Harry

    I think we got the point that all the firefighters are volunteer from this article. The issue in the skook is Half the area is on drugs, the roads haven’t been paved in years and houses are falling apart. But they care about this garbage! encrypted radios, a train station without a real train station and class a softball.

    • Whoa nellie

      Right on! Let’s get the roads like billiard tables, clean up all the druggies, and have all the houses look like the French Riveria. To hell with emergency services! Let the buildings burn, people can cut themselves out of the car they wrecked, and they can drive themselves to the hospital with a broken leg.

      • Harry

        75 8percent of the skook calls are old blighted Row homes or half doubles burning down, drug overdoses or dui accidents. Seems like deeper problems! Taxes through roof for guys playing firefighter. In most states semi rural areas even got professional services!

    • Jk Rowling

      $800 is down payment on one of those new radios. Oh, I get it, you didn’t win the bid. Or are you just a disgruntled nosey-body that can’t listen to scanner-land any more? Plant a garden instead, it’s healthier.

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