Tight-Knit Community Reacts to Supermarket Shooting

WYOMING COUNTY --  It looked like a normal busy morning at Gay's True Value in Tunkhannock, but it certainly didn't feel normal a day after another Tunkhannock area business, Weis Markets in Eaton Township, was the scene of a murder-suicide.

It's three victims, Terry Sterling, Victoria Brong, and Brian Hayes, all members of the tight-knit community.

"It's hard to imagine it's actually happening in a small community, you hear about it in big cities, but here it is in a small community and it's just tough to fathom right now," Dan Gay, of Gay's True Value, said.

Dan Gay says this is an un-natural disaster, in a community used to handling natural disasters. Gay's True Value was destroyed by the 2011 floods.

"That's one thing about our community, if something ever happens like this, or like when the flood, the whole community gets together and we help each other out. They helped us out in the flood so we'd help them out if we needed to," Gay said.

Over at Creekside Gardens in Eaton Township, the owners say customers have stopped by just to for a chance look at something beautiful.

"When we woke up and found the news out, it just seemed, you know, just unbelievable, you can't even describe it. I don't know the victims but it doesn't matter. They're part of the community, and it just hurts everyone to think that something like that can happen," Sherri Kukuchka, of Creekside Gardens, said.

Sherri Kukuchka says it won't feel normal again for a while, but Tunkhannock has proven again and again the community is resilient.

"Every day is a new day and you have to have hope that the human spirit will prevail and that most people are good and believe that and move forward each day, I guess," Kukuchka said.

The Weis Markets is closed. But that didn't stop passersby from stopping by to drop off flowers and other mementos to help honor Terry Sterling, Victoria Brong and Brian Hayes.

Among those dropping off flowers were family members— others were former employees, and others were just longtime patrons to this supermarket, part of the pulse of Wyoming County.

"This is something we're getting used to — almost like a terrorist attack and unsuspecting and innocent people and my heart just goes out to the families," Merna Miller, Lake Winola, said.

Wyoming County Commissioner Tom Henry is already working with different organizations to help out the victims' families, along with setting up available counselors within the county.

"I know the people in Wyoming County to reach out and help and get back to some kind of normalcy. I know we'll do all it takes to get that store back up and running and to move forward," Wyoming County Commissioner Tom Henry said.

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