Power To Save: Turning Christmas Tree into Perfume

SCRANTON -- Inside Note Fragrances on Spruce Street in Scranton, it smells like a blue spruce Christmas tree, but you won't find a tree towering over any fragrances.

Owner Danielle Fleming converted her family Christmas tree from 2015 into a perfume.

"I said we can do something better," Fleming said. "I love that aroma of the fresh Christmas tree in our house and I said let's do something."

An expert in fragrances, Fleming tinkered with the recipe over several months using a process called tincturing.

"What happens is, the raw materials blend in with the alcohol base so tincturing is a very old-school method. You can tincture different herbs for teas and things like that but this is tincturing in a perfuming perspective," she explained.

And she's bottling her success and spreading her tips and tricks in a new class. Starting next week, everyone can capture the smells of a Christmas tree to keep for years to come.

"This would be something to wear. In the end, you're going to get a finished final fragrance. They would take this and make the tincture in the first past of the class. Then a few months later, we have the second part of the class and you have this base and add a few more aromatics to it."

Whether it's blue spruce, Fraser fir, Douglas fir, or whatever your preference, Fleming believes you can convert it into something that'll last.

"You're kind of stuck and you feel bad; you love a fresh tree but you're putting it out on the curb, so here's a way to at least get some extra life out of it."

You can sign up for a class on how to create your own Christmas tree fragrance by clicking here.