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Breaking the Cycle of Broken Resolutions

CLARKS SUMMIT -- Whether it's quitting smoking, getting more sleep, or losing that spare tire, many of us make New Year's resolutions every year--but don't follow through on them.

So what's the alternative?

In Lackawanna County, people we met were trying to start the new year off on the right foot.

Nick Darbenzio of Clarks Summit rejoined Brown's Gym on New Year's Day, resolving to get there three times a week.

"You know, I had to get here just for a little while."

Hunter Crook of Dalton hopes to put some punch into one of the most popular resolutions of all: eating better.

"Try not to eat so much junk food. I really have been going to Burger King a lot. I went there last night," Crook said.

For many of us, making New Year's resolutions is an annual tradition, so is forgetting about them.

We wondered if the world of yoga could offer a solution to the cycle of broken resolutions.

"People think, 'Oh, I am going to go on a diet.' If they fall off the diet one day, it is out the window," said Hillary Steinberg, owner of Jaya Yoga.

At Jaya Yoga in Clarks Summit, teachers say they have a different way of getting their students to think about making changes for the new year.

Instructors explain while these poses are impressive, yoga is also about an outlook off the mat that includes self acceptance and making progress slowly.

"Maintenance is a lot easier than putting a big huge task ahead of yourself," said Cat Maria, yoga instructor.

They suggest instead of resolutions, pick a theme to keep in mind all year long.

"What drives me to make good choices? What drives me to make bad choices? It's that focus. It's that attention to the why," added Steinberg.

One of the lessons: if you fall down, get up and go on.

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