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Setting and Keeping New Year’s Goals

DANVILLE -- There weren't too many people working out at "Anytime Fitness" in Danville when Newswatch 16 stopped by, but the ones who were, were working hard.

Those inside the gym had mixed opinions on New Years resolutions.

"More or less just budgeting, getting closer with my family, things like that," Alex Laubauch of Danville commented.

Jacob Shrawder of Sunbury decided to opt out of having a resolution. "I think it's just an excuse for people. If you're going to do something why does it have to be in the beginning of the year?"

Many people do wake up on January first, ready with plans to save money, quit a bad habit or lose weight. Doctor Robert Gerstman, a psychiatrist at Geisinger Health System says when it comes to new year's resolutions less is more.

" You have the people who want to do four resolutions at once. Let's just start with one. You pick one and you give yourself a period of time. Once that resolution is taken care of you move onto the second one."  Dr. Gerstman says people put too much pressure on themselves and get frustrated when the resolution does not happen. "They are very hard on themselves, spouses are hard on them, family can be hard on them."

The people Newswatch 16 found working out at Anytime Fitness say they see people give up too soon.

"A lot of people get resolutions to come here and then they just give up right away. But it all depends. If you put your mind to it, no reason why you can't do it," said Laubach.

If losing weight is one of your goals, Dr. Gerstman suggests trying to lose four pounds a month instead of saying you want to lose 100 pounds by the end of the year.

"If they have some early disappointments they just work through them and they continue and not give up," commented Dr. Gerstman.