Alleged Victims’ Testimony: Empowering

This was the third straight day of testimony from alleged victims in this case.

Men in their twenties, one recently turned 18, but they were just boys when they claim Jerry Sandusky abused them.

The details and the emotion of it all has led to plenty of reaction.

The day started with a man who said he kept quiet for years, never telling a soul about his sexual abuser.

Several more men did the same in the courtroom in Centre County, all accusing Jerry Sandusky of doing unspeakable things.

 Among those in the courtroom listening to the graphic testimony was Matt Bodenschatz of Voices for Victims. He said what the alleged victims have done by testifying against Sandusky is empowering.

“As an adult survivor who has gone thru this, to see others with an incredible amount of bravery and poise and fortitude. When this trial ends, their story doesn’t end. I’m telling you from first-hand experience, this is them for the rest of their lives,” said Bodenschatz.

Their stories have been similar in many ways. As defense attorneys have pointed out; some details have changed over time.

According to victim and witness experts, that is not uncommon for anyone who was abused and got help years later.

“It’s like their entire lives have been shattered and pieces of that experience are floating around in their memory, and they slowly remember details, some more vivid than others,” said Jennifer Storm, a victim and witness advocate.

Storm has dealt with sexual abuse victims in her line of work, and doesn’t believe the inconsistencies in the mens’ testimonies will raise doubt in jurors’ minds.

“The defense thus far, their only defense really has been oh this might have only have happened a couple times and these kids are in it for the money,” said Storm.

Bill Boychak and his wife drove to the trial from Schuylkill County. They were interested to hear for themselves what witnesses in Jerry Sandusky’s sex abuse trial had to say.

“It’s sad for all people, not just the children, but everybody involved in it. We hope it turns out the best way it can,” said Bill Boychak of Shenandoah.